While precise numbers of techie drug users are impossible to come by, most treatment and addiction experts see evidence of a growing problem borne of a potent cocktail: newly minted wealth, intense competition between companies and among their workers, the deadline pressure of one product launch after another and a robust regional black-market drug pipeline.

"There’s this workaholism in the valley, where the ability to work on crash projects at tremendous rates of speed is almost a badge of honor," says Steve Albrecht, a San Diego consultant who teaches substance abuse awareness for Bay Area employers. "These workers stay up for days and days, and many of them gradually get into meth and coke to keep going. Red Bull and coffee only gets them so far."

Furthering the problem, many tech companies do little or no drug testing because, as Albrecht put it, “they want the results, but they don’t want to know how their employees got the results.””
"… when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together - until he died, when i was just 6. 

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years. but once i did, i noticed something. we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came. and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST. literaly. 

you know, when a time race happens, that the fastest lap so far gets recorded as a ghost driver? yep, you guessed it - his ghost still rolls around the track today. and so i played and played, and played, untill i was almost able to beat the ghost. until one day i got ahead of it, i surpassed it, and… i stopped right in front of the finish line, just to ensure i wouldnt delete it.

Bliss.” 

(via Teenage son discovers his deceased father’s ghost car in Xbox rally game | Motoramic - Yahoo Autos)

"… when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together - until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years. but once i did, i noticed something. we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came. and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST. literaly.

you know, when a time race happens, that the fastest lap so far gets recorded as a ghost driver? yep, you guessed it - his ghost still rolls around the track today. and so i played and played, and played, untill i was almost able to beat the ghost. until one day i got ahead of it, i surpassed it, and… i stopped right in front of the finish line, just to ensure i wouldnt delete it.

Bliss.”

(via Teenage son discovers his deceased father’s ghost car in Xbox rally game | Motoramic - Yahoo Autos)

"In the simplest possible terms, if the pattern of activity measured during one dream looks more like activity associated with viewing a person, compared to activity associated with seeing an empty street scene, then you should say that the dream probably contains a person, if you were forced to guess. This is the essence of their decoding algorithm. They use sophisticated ways to characterise patterns in fMRI activity (support vector machine), but essentially the idea is simply to match up, as best they can, the brain patterns observed during sleep with those measures during wakeful viewing of corresponding images."

Brain Box: In the news: Decoding dreams with fMRI

Oh, just researchers in Japan who can broadly guess at what you are dreaming about, if they can correlate the FMRI-revealed brain patterns with those produced when you’re look at specific images. NBD.

Long after the humans are gone, long after the trees are gone, this will persist.

(via 10 Tree Roots Winning Their Battle Against Concrete | Bored Panda)

Not sure who wins this round. But long term, my money’s on the tree.

(via 10 Tree Roots Winning Their Battle Against Concrete | Bored Panda)

Not sure who wins this round. But long term, my money’s on the tree.

Among the packages that arrived while I was on my back. “They’ve Invaded Pleasantville,” TSR 1981.

Among the packages that arrived while I was on my back. “They’ve Invaded Pleasantville,” TSR 1981.

kenyatta:

So much of my high school worldview was shaped by listening to recorded lectures and spoken word albums by the likes of bell hooks, Malcolm X, Alan Watts, Noam Chomsky, and this guy, Jello Biafra.
Highly recommended (although dated): Beyond the Valley of the Gift Police.

I love my friend Kenyatta — not for the fact of this, but maybe partly for the varied personal effects of this. 

kenyatta:

So much of my high school worldview was shaped by listening to recorded lectures and spoken word albums by the likes of bell hooks, Malcolm X, Alan Watts, Noam Chomsky, and this guy, Jello Biafra.

Highly recommended (although dated): Beyond the Valley of the Gift Police.

I love my friend Kenyatta — not for the fact of this, but maybe partly for the varied personal effects of this. 

Reblogged from Final Boss Form
googlegeist:

Mirrors Behind The Curtain: Skokloster Castle, Google Museum View Screenshot, 2014
~googlegeist~

googlegeist:

Mirrors Behind The Curtain: Skokloster Castle, Google Museum View Screenshot, 2014

~googlegeist~

Reblogged from Googlegeist
blazepress:

F1 steering wheels. 1954 on the left, 2014 on the right.

This is my new favorite thing ever.

blazepress:

F1 steering wheels. 1954 on the left, 2014 on the right.

This is my new favorite thing ever.

A suburban Philadelphia school district is agreeing to pay $610,000 to settle two lawsuits brought by students who were victims of a webcam spying scandal in which high school-issued laptops secretly snapped thousands of pictures of pupils.

[…]

Prosecutors and the FBI opened an inquiry following a February privacy lawsuit accusing administrators of spying on students with webcams on the 2,300 district-issued MacBooks. The lawyers who filed lawsuits on behalf of two students acquired evidence in pretrial proceedings showing that the district secretly snapped thousands of webcam images of students, including pictures of youths at home, in bed or even “partially dressed.”

[…]

The original suit was based on a claim by Robbins, a sophomore at the time, that school officials reprimanded him for “improper behavior” based on photos the computer secretly took of the boy at home last fall. One picture shows him asleep at home last October.

That “behavior” turned out to be pill popping. The family said their son was eating Mike and Ike candy, his lawyer claimed.

In all, about 400 photos were taken of Robbins. The tracking software on Hasan’s computer snapped as many as 469 photographs and 543 screenshots of the former senior.

If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”
Reblogged from deathbeard
This weekend also brought allegations that Warner Bros. had hired Kevin Smith to write a fake screenplay for the 2016 tentpole Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, with the express intent of leaking it online as a decoy to draw spoiler-hunters away from any legitimate news. If that’s true, it’s a genius move: at the very least, an official-looking red-herring screenplay would cause enough confusion to prevent any genuine leaks from spreading too far.”

BBC handles leaked Doctor Who script better than Hollywood (Wired UK)

God how I would love to start an agency focused entirely on False Flag operations. You can do whatever you want, and it is likely to be seen by more people than the signal it is masking.