The symmetry between impoverished Chinese people making phones that are flown round the world, for impoverished Chinese people to purchase, all in order to serve the urgent desires of wealthy people.

If there’s any better parable to explain the realities of late capitalism, I hope Casey Neistat is there to shoot it.

I was visiting NYC not too long ago, and saw five Asian people in chairs in front of that that Apple store. They must have been the the first five. I remember thinking, what the actual fuck, and wondering whether they were being paid to sit there for several days. But I put that idea out of my head and thought, it’s probably something far more benign, and I’m a little ashamed about that part that wanted to believe it was benign.

Never forget.

Never forget.

Meanwhile in Cambridge

Meanwhile in Cambridge

Hello old friend. I’m sorry for what they did to you.

Hello old friend. I’m sorry for what they did to you.

A community made up of American ex-pats deep in the South American hills of Chile – far away from America’s annoying taxes, healthcare mandate, and legal abortions — was supposed to be a libertarian paradise of rugged individualism. Instead it cost many of the people who bought into it almost everything, and now is buried under lawsuits — a reminder that everything that glitters is not inflation-proof, Ron Paul-backed gold.

It seems pretty obvious that basing one’s society on a single work of (poorly written) fiction is folly, but for many adherents of Ayn Rand and her seminal book of Objectivist allegorical grandstanding, Atlas Shrugged isn’t just any book. It’s about as close to the Bible that many libertarians have — apart from the Bible, of course. It’s influenced an astounding number of conservative public figures — from Ron Paul to Rand Paul to Ronald Reagan. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney’s Rand-loving running mate and probable 2016 presidential contender, said it was his favorite book growing up.”
#sketchinginbio

#sketchinginbio

Jargon aside, what exactly differentiates “an Alfred” from a plain old personal servant is not entirely clear. Perhaps it’s the fact that “Alfreds” apparently come unburdened by individual names of their own. Which is nice, because real names can be hard to remember and disconcertingly humanizing, like when you go to a fancy restaurant and they serve your fish with the head still on.”

Don’t ask me anything about it and don’t look anything up. Just travel to the Boston ICA to see the Ragnar Kjartansson piece there. Just go.

sovietbuildings:

Poland, Wrocław, 1974, Communal building
Designed by Witold Jerzy Molicki

sovietbuildings:

Poland, Wrocław, 1974, Communal building

Designed by Witold Jerzy Molicki

Reblogged from Scrapbook

sixpenceee:

fluxmachine:

itscolossal:

Artist Kevin Weir Creates Ghostly Animated GIFs Using Archival Photos from the Library of Congress [Sponsor]

I was featured on colossal today, very exciting.

Woah this is amazing. 

Reblogged from §

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

Wait I thought all this got resolved when Ferguson MO stopped being so fucking anxious. I can’t believe oh wait I do believe.

Reblogged from Final Boss Form
And then there is the dying. In a rare moment of what may pass for levity Eberstadt allows himself the following chapter subtitle: “Pioneering New and Modern Pathways to Poor Health and Premature Death.” Russians did not start dying early and often after the collapse of the Soviet Union. “To the contrary,” writes Eberstadt, what is happening now is “merely the latest culmination of ominous trends that have been darkly evident on Russian soil for almost half a century.” With the exception of two brief periods—when Soviet Russia was ruled by Khrushchev and again when it was run by Gorbachev—death rates have been inexorably rising. This continued to be true even during the period of unprecedented economic growth between 1999 and 2008. In this study, published in 2010, Eberstadt accurately predicts that in the coming years the depopulation trend may be moderated but argues that it will not be reversed; in 2013 Russia’s birthrate was still lower and its death rate still higher than they had been in 1991. And 1991 had not been a good year.

Contrary to Parsons’s argument, moreover, Eberstadt shows that the current trend is not largely a problem of middle-aged Russians. While the graphs seem to indicate this, he notes, if one takes into account the fact that mortality rates normally rise with age, it is the younger generation that is staring down the most terrifying void. According to 2006 figures, he writes, “overall life expectancy at age fifteen in the Russian Federation appears in fact to be lower than for some of the countries the UN designates to be least developed (as opposed to less developed), among these, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Yemen.” Male life expectancy at age fifteen in Russia compares unfavorably to that in Ethiopia, Gambia, and Somalia.”