001-030-n027 (by collations)

001-030-n027 (by collations)

The bolder and better idea, if one wishes to see if markets can outperform the “rigged” game devised by the feds, is to let investors choose the consumer protections they favor. Why not let exchanges set their own rules and let companies and customers decide if they wish to trade there? One could also let customers decide whether they even need a broker or an exchange. Maybe eBay could do better. Or maybe in a genuine free market, business would gravitate back to the NYSE.

One thing for sure is that if New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and others looking for headlines want to string up high-speed traders, honesty requires them to put the regulators at the front of the rope line.”
I have no idea what this picture is, but my friend Toby had it in his FB timeline. Timeline or no: timeless.

I have no idea what this picture is, but my friend Toby had it in his FB timeline. Timeline or no: timeless.

Bongwater - Folk Song - (from LP, ‘The Power of Pussy’) (youtube)

Low - I started a Joke (by izubellu)

Kurt Koller reminded me that I don’t listen to enough Low these days.

Since the herniated disc thing I’ve been using Task Rabbit for various things I need help with. Some days it works out ok. Some days I don’t get enough information and things fall apart. Other days, like today, I get slightly too much information.

Since the herniated disc thing I’ve been using Task Rabbit for various things I need help with. Some days it works out ok. Some days I don’t get enough information and things fall apart. Other days, like today, I get slightly too much information.

Hugh Herr gave his presentation at TED last week. I get to see Hugh and his work often, and that makes it easy to forget how radical, ambitious, and important his work is.

You’ve probably heard about this talk by now and can dismiss it because you keep hearing about it, or because TED whatever.

But I will urge you to give this your 18 minutes, because this is sort of what time is for, whether it’s yours, Hugh’s or anyone else’s.

Upside: Anything is Possible (by Upside)

It’s on. #ford

To me, the Oculus Rift is like wearing your parents’ basement on your face.”

No, I Will Not Strap A Giant Black Fantasy Box To My Face

I think I favor this over the “Segway for Your Face” description for Glass.

Game Theory - Dripping With Looks (by echoplus2020)

Just found out Scott Miller passed away last year. Lolita Nation got me through a rough spell in post-adolescent adolescence.

"Twenty years ago, when Matarasso first opened shop in San Francisco, he found that he was mostly helping patients in late middle age: former homecoming queens, spouses who’d been cheated on, spouses looking to cheat. Today, his practice is far larger and more lucrative than he could have ever imagined. He sees clients across a range of ages. He says he’s the world’s second-biggest dispenser of Botox. But this growth has nothing to do with his endearingly nebbishy mien. It is, rather, the result of a cultural revolution that has taken place all around him in the Bay Area.

Silicon Valley has become one of the most ageist places in America. Tech luminaries who otherwise pride themselves on their dedication to meritocracy don’t think twice about deriding the not-actually-old. “Young people are just smarter,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told an audience at Stanford back in 2007. As I write, the website of ServiceNow, a large Santa Clara–based I.T. services company, features the following advisory in large letters atop its “careers” page: “We Want People Who Have Their Best Work Ahead of Them, Not Behind Them.”

Silicon’s Valley’s Brutal Ageism | New Republic

If there’s anything we’ve learned from Wall Street, it’s that trading in “experience and wisdom” for “youthful innovation” leads to greater stability, profit and success for everyone in the system.

"Twenty years ago, when Matarasso first opened shop in San Francisco, he found that he was mostly helping patients in late middle age: former homecoming queens, spouses who’d been cheated on, spouses looking to cheat. Today, his practice is far larger and more lucrative than he could have ever imagined. He sees clients across a range of ages. He says he’s the world’s second-biggest dispenser of Botox. But this growth has nothing to do with his endearingly nebbishy mien. It is, rather, the result of a cultural revolution that has taken place all around him in the Bay Area.

Silicon Valley has become one of the most ageist places in America. Tech luminaries who otherwise pride themselves on their dedication to meritocracy don’t think twice about deriding the not-actually-old. “Young people are just smarter,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told an audience at Stanford back in 2007. As I write, the website of ServiceNow, a large Santa Clara–based I.T. services company, features the following advisory in large letters atop its “careers” page: “We Want People Who Have Their Best Work Ahead of Them, Not Behind Them.”

Silicon’s Valley’s Brutal Ageism | New Republic

If there’s anything we’ve learned from Wall Street, it’s that trading in “experience and wisdom” for “youthful innovation” leads to greater stability, profit and success for everyone in the system.


"WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?
Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.
Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.
…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.”
— Derrick Jensen | Forget Shorter Showers: Why Personal Changes Does Not Equal Political Change

"WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?

Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.

Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.

…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.”

Derrick Jensen | Forget Shorter Showers: Why Personal Changes Does Not Equal Political Change

Reblogged from Untitled

enochliew:

Photographs by Thom Sheridan

In 1986, the United Way attempted to break the world record for balloon launches, by releasing 1.5 million balloons, which resulted in two deaths, millions in lawsuits, and a devastating environmental impact.

You forgot the part about using up the finite store of helium, what we can use for cryogenics, superconducting magnets for medical research, or YOUR 1.5 MILLION FUCKING BALLOONS.

Reblogged from End of the World News

New York City Doesn’t Love You

johndevore:



New York doesn’t miss me. I don’t even think New York knows I’m gone.

I thought about writing one of those “Why I Left New York” essays on the off chance that New York would notice. I knew better.

Why did I leave New York?

For a job. I took a job. A good job. L.A. smells like flowers all the fucking time and I think that smell is pumped in from kind of secret reservoir of perfume. But I didn’t leave New York because I fell out of love with the city.

If New York had voice mail I would leave it insane messages day and night. I would tell it how much I love and miss it. The energy. The culture. The Jamaican meat pies.

There would be sobbing.

I would text it “hi” and “sup” and “r u ok” constantly.

I love New York. My love is strong. My love is psycho.

Even if I never return, I will always look back on getting my ass kicked fondly.

My back once went out on my way to work, and New York did nothing as I squirmed in unbelievable agony on the streets of Queens. I dragged myself by my bloody fingertips five blocks back to my apartment.

Isn’t that beautiful?

If you love something, let it go. If it doesn’t come back, boo-hoo, write an essay.
Reblogged from Don JeVore

NCAA Bracket 2014: The Mathematician vs. the Matildas | The New York Times (by The New York Times)

No specific commentary here. It’s just kind of a charming little video.