(via Location-Based Light Painting by Philipp Schmitt, Interaction Designer)

Video here, worth watching to see what’s going on, which is beautiful. Via Timo.

(via Location-Based Light Painting by Philipp Schmitt, Interaction Designer)

Video here, worth watching to see what’s going on, which is beautiful. Via Timo.

Tilt-Shift Office - (34/365) (by Fab05)

Tilt-Shift Office - (34/365) (by Fab05)

"This weekend at the DefCon hacker conference in Las Vegas, Bransfield will debut the next logical step: The “WarKitteh” collar, a device he built for less than $100 that turns any outdoor cat into a Wifi-sniffing hacker accomplice. 

Despite the title of his DefCon talk—”How To Weaponize Your Pets”–Bransfield admits WarKitteh doesn’t represent a substantial security threat. Rather, it’s the sort of goofy hack designed to entertain the con’s hacker audience. Still, he was surprised by just how many networks tracked by his data-collecting cat used WEP, a form of wireless encryption known for more than ten years to be easily broken. “My intent was not to show people where to get free Wi-Fi. I put some technology on a cat and let it roam around because the idea amused me,” says Bransfield, who works for the security consultancy Tenacity. “But the result of this cat research was that there were a lot more open and WEP-encrypted hot spots out there than there should be in 2014.” (via How to Use Your Cat to Hack Your Neighbor’s Wi-Fi | Threat Level | WIRED)

"This weekend at the DefCon hacker conference in Las Vegas, Bransfield will debut the next logical step: The “WarKitteh” collar, a device he built for less than $100 that turns any outdoor cat into a Wifi-sniffing hacker accomplice.

Despite the title of his DefCon talk—”How To Weaponize Your Pets”–Bransfield admits WarKitteh doesn’t represent a substantial security threat. Rather, it’s the sort of goofy hack designed to entertain the con’s hacker audience. Still, he was surprised by just how many networks tracked by his data-collecting cat used WEP, a form of wireless encryption known for more than ten years to be easily broken. “My intent was not to show people where to get free Wi-Fi. I put some technology on a cat and let it roam around because the idea amused me,” says Bransfield, who works for the security consultancy Tenacity. “But the result of this cat research was that there were a lot more open and WEP-encrypted hot spots out there than there should be in 2014.” (via How to Use Your Cat to Hack Your Neighbor’s Wi-Fi | Threat Level | WIRED)

pheezy:

Detail of decal work on Frame No. 1. Heh. by sampotts http://ift.tt/VnNn3n

pheezy:

Detail of decal work on Frame No. 1. Heh. by sampotts http://ift.tt/VnNn3n

Reblogged from Pheezy In Wonderland

"I think: This digital memory is better than mine—it frequently recalls things and places I have no personal, onboard memory of, and over time I come to rely on it over my own memories, just as I recall my sister’s birth not through my own vision, but in the form of a photograph of the event. I appear, physically and impossibly, in my own mental image.
Francesco Pedraglio, who I saw perform at the National Portrait Gallery last week, spoke of “non-experiential memories”. He meant things which had not happened, but of which we have memories nonetheless. He meant delusions. (In the same evening, Tom McCarthy said “Realism is a literary style with no more purchase on the real than Burroughs or Gysin”.)
This digital memory sits somewhere between experience and non-experience; it is also an approximation; it is also a lie. These location records do not show where I was, but an approximation based on the device’s own idea of place, its own way of seeing. They cross-reference me with digital infrastructure, with cell towers and wireless networks, with points created by others in its database. Where I correlate location with physical landmarks, friends and personal experiences, the algorithms latch onto invisible, virtual spaces, and the extant memories of strangers.”

(via Where the F**k Was I? (A Book) | booktwo.org)
—
Had reason to recall this, this evening, the work of my inimitable and extraordinary friend James Bridle. But I had forgotten how eloquently he speaks on this new and old thing, memory. I forgot how precisely this outlines the blur.

"I think: This digital memory is better than mine—it frequently recalls things and places I have no personal, onboard memory of, and over time I come to rely on it over my own memories, just as I recall my sister’s birth not through my own vision, but in the form of a photograph of the event. I appear, physically and impossibly, in my own mental image.

Francesco Pedraglio, who I saw perform at the National Portrait Gallery last week, spoke of “non-experiential memories”. He meant things which had not happened, but of which we have memories nonetheless. He meant delusions. (In the same evening, Tom McCarthy said “Realism is a literary style with no more purchase on the real than Burroughs or Gysin”.)

This digital memory sits somewhere between experience and non-experience; it is also an approximation; it is also a lie. These location records do not show where I was, but an approximation based on the device’s own idea of place, its own way of seeing. They cross-reference me with digital infrastructure, with cell towers and wireless networks, with points created by others in its database. Where I correlate location with physical landmarks, friends and personal experiences, the algorithms latch onto invisible, virtual spaces, and the extant memories of strangers.”

(via Where the F**k Was I? (A Book) | booktwo.org)

Had reason to recall this, this evening, the work of my inimitable and extraordinary friend James Bridle. But I had forgotten how eloquently he speaks on this new and old thing, memory. I forgot how precisely this outlines the blur.

"The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying." 

(via America Is Not For Black People)

—

This is from an article that Jenna Wortham describes as “the hardest thing I’ve ever read” and I feel like, while I’ve read even worse than this, it’s not a competition I’m interested in. It’s horrorshow. 

The article itself is much bigger and more important than this particular quote — which I think is really the broadest point made. It resists summary or reduction, and that’s one reason to read it.

"The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying."

(via America Is Not For Black People)

This is from an article that Jenna Wortham describes as “the hardest thing I’ve ever read” and I feel like, while I’ve read even worse than this, it’s not a competition I’m interested in. It’s horrorshow.

The article itself is much bigger and more important than this particular quote — which I think is really the broadest point made. It resists summary or reduction, and that’s one reason to read it.

kenyatta:

thebestofmemovie:

You never forget your first love. Don’t miss The Best of Me - in theaters October 17. 

watching this gif feels exhausting and I can’t figure out why.

watching this gif makes my back hurt.

kenyatta:

thebestofmemovie:

You never forget your first love. Don’t miss The Best of Me - in theaters October 17. 

watching this gif feels exhausting and I can’t figure out why.

watching this gif makes my back hurt.

Reblogged from Final Boss Form
We are a team of libertarian cocaine dealers. We never buy coke from cartels! We never buy coke from police! We help farmers from Peru, Bolivia and some chemistry students in Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina. We do fair trade! – Excerpt from seller page – Evolution, accessed December 28, 2013

This is the best opium you will try, by purchasing this you are supporting local farmers in the hills of Guatemala and you are not financing violent drug cartels. – Excerpt from seller page – Evolution, accessed March 28, 2014”
'Fair trade' cocaine and 'conflict-free' opium: the future of online drug marketing via Alexis Madrigal, amazing article about how the illegal drug trade plays out online.
While I expected that what I saw might change, what I never expected was the impact my behavior would have on my friends’ feeds. I kept thinking Facebook would rate-limit me, but instead it grew increasingly ravenous. My feed become a cavalcade of brands and politics and as I interacted with them, Facebook dutifully reported this to all my friends and followers.

That first night, a small little circle with a dog’s head popped up in the corner of my phone. A chat head, from Facebook’s Messenger software! The dog turned out to be my old WIRED editor, John Bradley. “Have you been hacked,” he wanted to know. The next morning, my friend Helena sent me a message. “My fb feed is literally full of articles you like, it’s kind of funny,” she says. “No friend stuff, just Honan likes.” I replied with a thumbs up. This continued throughout the experiment. When I posted a status update to Facebook just saying “I like you,” I heard from numerous people that my weirdo activity had been overrunning their feeds. “My newsfeed is 70 percent things Mat has liked,” noted my pal Heather. Eventually, I would hear from someone who worked at Facebook, who had noticed my activity and wanted to connect me with the company’s PR department.”

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me | Gadget Lab | WIRED

There are a lot of interesting things in this article about the effects of “liking everything” on FB. But far as I’m concerned, that last sentence is really the gem.

(“Trenches have a distinctive zig zag pattern to minimize the damage a single bullet or explosion could cause. This photo also shows the scale of devastation that bombing left on the landscape.” via Aerial Photography From WWI Shows the Massive Scale of Devastation | Science | WIRED)

Inspired in part by Chris Woebken’s work, last semester was spent puzzling over animal perception by the ways that animals build, move, and act. it was really an exercise in armchair phenomenology, in starting to consider human perception with the same distance.

When you look — with that distance — at the evidence of our brief tenure on the planet, you come across these epic collaborative structures built by thousands, or millions of people in short periods of time. This one, from a hundred years ago, is a pretty solid argument for the two unique aspects of our species tangled up so deeply with one another. They are the quality of being seduced and motivated by wildly irrational ideas, and the ability to see things through with rational ant-like precision.

If I have to bet on which impulse determines the fate of the species, I still bet on that first one, the irrational drive. Whether that’s hopeful or hopeless, it’s still a good bet.

On the surface it’s aims are laudable Every one of us. Everywhere. Connected, it is set up to serve people such as the farmers and students I’ve met on this trip, those who will significantly benefit from basic connectivity. The sentiment of my peers, including conversations with some Facebook employees is that Internet.org’s intent is closer to Every one of us. Everywhere. Connected to Facebook. Feeding the Beast, a solution to a growth strategy that was hitting natural limits, and a flag in the distant sands for stock-vested troops to charge towards.”
The people dancing and talking and singing in beige rooms with 8’ ceilings are surrounded by standards, physically and online. Technological standards like HTML5 also allow us to view web pages and look at video over the Internet. All of their frolic is bounded by a set of conventions that are essentially invisible yet define our national physical and technological architecture. Their dancing, talking bodies are the only non-standardized things in the videos.

But we’re working on that too. Michelle Phan’s makeup tutorials have hundreds of millions of views. Behind Phan are lovely, well-produced backgrounds. They shift and move over and over.”